The sharp ‘needle’ projections on the tail feathers can usually only be seen when the bird is in the hand. Bird Notes 1: 38-40. Every bird has a story. Pp. Handbook of birds of the world. These migratory birds are native to eastern and northern Australia. Each species account is written by leading ornithologists and provides detailed information on bird distribution, migration, habitat, diet, sounds, behavior, breeding, current population status, and conservation. 1943. It is reputed to reach speeds of up to 170 km/h (105 mph) in horizontal flight, but this is unverified because the methods used to measure its speed have not been published. Priority actions are the specific, practical things that must be done to recover a threatened species, population or ecological community. Proceeding of the Royal Society B 279: 3114-3120. Aug 3, 2016 - White-throated Needletail, Spine-tailed or Needle-tailed Swift - central Asia and southern Siberia, wintering in the Indian sub-continent, SE Asia and … Proceeding of the Royal Society B 279: 3114-3120. An extensive multimedia section displays the latest photos, videos and audio selections from the Macaulay Library. Its breeding habitat is freshwater lakes and rivers across northern North America, Greenland, Europe and Asia. White-throated Needletails are usually observed hunting above forest or woodland. Barn-owls to hummingbirds. ; Grooms, C.; Kimpe, L.E. The bird is short-legged and uses the legs to cling to a vertical surface. At a maximum speed of 105 mph, white-throated needletail is the fastest bird in flapping flight. Melville, D.S. Recommended Citation. Chantler, P.; Driessens, G. 1995. 5.1-5.100 in Podulka, S.; Rohrbaugh, R.W. A large, powerful swift, usually seen flying above montane forests. At close range, grayish (rather than white) throat patch and a smaller, duller pale patch on the back are distinctive. They are reported to be the fastest flying bird, travelling at 170 kph – one source even suggesting that they can attain 349 kph in straight flight! ; Kysrer, K.; Michelutti, N.; Reudink, M.; Smol, J.P. 2012. New Zealand Birds Online. Guy M. Kirwan. Able, K.P. English: White-throated Needletail: Scientific (Hirundapus caudacutus caudacutus)Order: APODIFORMES: Family (Latin) Apodidae: Family (English) Swifts: Other name(s) Martinet à queue épineuse, Asian Spine-tailed Swift, Spine-tailed Swift, Needle-tailed Swift Chantler, P. 1999. White-throated Needletail. (Eds.). Similar species: All potential confusion species are smaller than the white-throated needletail. Hirundapus caudacutus Family Apodidae (swifts). What is the speed in km/h? 388-417 in del Hoyo, J.; Elliott, A.; Sargatal, J. Adult in flight. Feeds on flying insects, such as termites, ants, beetles and flies. (ed.) Tiritiri Matangi Island, November 2016. Birds usually feed in rising thermal currents associated with storm fronts and bushfires and they are commonly seen moving with wind fronts. (Ed.). The White-throated Needletail may also be called the Needle-tailed Swift or Spin-tailed Swift. 2. These birds have very short legs which they use only for clinging to … McCaskill, L.W. http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicspecies.pl?taxon_id=682, http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=1750, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-throated_Needletail. They catch the insects in flight in their wide gaping beaks. Pictures of White-throated needletail and many more. ; Finity, L.K. It’s about the time of the 1940s and ’50s when the story of sailfish that traveled at the speed of […] A herd of White-throated Needletail. Uncommon, non-breeding summer migrant. A comparison of data from the two bird Atlas projects in Australia (1977-1981 and 1998-2002) indicates a decline in distribution and reporting rates. Fork-tailed swift is all dark except for a pale throat and a white band across the rump and has a deeply forked tail. White-throated Needletail (Hirundapus caudacutus) bird calls on dibird.com. 2013 [updated 2017]. White-throated needletails are large swifts with a stout, barrel-like body. This bird is quite large, and is the fastest bird during level flight, reaching speeds up to 105 mph. Incubation ranges from 17 to 23 days and is carried out by both parents. Most white-throated needletails occur in Australia between October and April, which is when most New Zealand records have occurred. White-throated needletail. They have large mouths that are used to feed on ‘aerial plankton’. It is commonly reputed to reach velocities of up to 170 km/h (105 mph), though this has not been verified. It is also known as needle-tailed swift or spine-tailed swift. 1 . ; Beresford, D.V. It is commonly reputed to reach speeds of up to 170 km/h (105 mph), though this has not been verified. In Miskelly, C.M. Other names: spine-tailed swift, needle-tailed swift, northern needletail, whitethroated needletail, white throated needletail, spinetailed swift, spine tailed swift, Geographical variation: Two races, with the nominate race straying to New Zealand, White-throated needletail. The White-throated Needletail feeds on flying insects, such as termites, ants, beetles and flies. The only swift in its range that combines a clean white throat and smooth pale gray back. Image © Martin Sanders by Martin Sanders. Vol 4. Breeding in Eurasia: e, s Asia; can be seen in 51 countries. 1999. Apr 30, 2017 - All information about White-throated needletail. The fastest animals in the world may endeavor through air, water, or land. White-throated needletail hunting over Volochayevka Pervaya. Similar in size and shape to White-throated Needletail and can be difficult to distinguish in poor lighting. Birds on the move: flight and migration. white-throated needletail WildNet taxon ID 1971 Alternate name(s) spine-tailed swift Nature Conservation Act 1992 (NCA) status Vulnerable Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC) status Vulnerable Back on Track (BoT) status Low Conservation significant Yes Endemicity Native Oxford University Press, Melbourne. Handbook of bird biology. Discover them all with Birds of the World. The field guide to the birds of New Zealand. The Office of Environment and Heritage has identified 0 priority actions to help recover the White-throated Needletail in New South Wales. Birds usually feed in rising thermal currents associated with storm fronts and bushfires and they are commonly seen moving with wind fronts. Birds usually feed in rising thermal currents associated with storm fronts and bushfires and they are commonly seen moving with wind fronts. Injured adult held in the hand, anxiety or distress calls. Needletails are gregarious and spend most of the time flying, however they will roost perched on trees. The White-throated Needletail may also be called the Needle-tailed Swift or Spin-tailed Swift. (ed.) Pica Press, Sussex. Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic birds: http://notornis.osnz.org.nz/system/files/Notornis_1_4.pdf. Downloadable at: http://notornis.osnz.org.nz/system/files/Notornis_1_4.pdf. Most records are of single birds, but there are occasional ‘invasions’ when flocks of up to ‘hundreds’ may occur (McCaskill 1943). (Eds.). ; Bonney, R. www.nzbirdsonline.org.nz, Similar species: Welcome swallow, Fork-tailed swift, Tree martin. During the non-breeding season in Australia, the White-throated Needletail has been recorded eating a wide variety of insects, including beetles, cicadas, flying ants, bees, wasps, flies, termites, moths, locusts and grasshoppe rs (Cameron 1968; Madden 1982; Rose 1997; White-throated needletail. It has been claimed to be the fastest bird in level flight, reaching speeds of 129 km/h (80 mph), but is disputed whether the White-throated Needletail is faster, reportedly flying at 170 km/h (105mph). The sharp ‘needle’ projections on the tail feathers can usually only be seen when the bird is in the hand. Hirundapus caudacutus Scientific name; White-throated Needletail Common name; Not Sensitive; Rare or uncommon Native; Non-Invasive; 609.1m to 818.7m Recorded at altitude; Revisors. Historical pesticide applications coincided with an altered diet of aerially foraging insectivorous chimney swifts. They are the fastest flying bird in flapping flight, reaching a speed of 105 mph. There is no doubt that human beings are those creatures of the animal kingdom who are superior in all attributes to animals. It catches the insects in flight in their wide beaks. Ornithological Society Of The Middle East The Caucasus And Central Asia, RED DE OBSERVADORES DE AVES Y VIDA SILVESTRE DE CHILE. Flies higher than most other swifts during migration, often circling over mountaintops and valleys with kettles of migrating birds of prey. In a single year the common swift can cover at least 200,000 km (125.000 mi). 2013 [updated 2017]. Their legs are so short and their wings so long that they are unable to take off if they are placed on the ground. The invasion of New Zealand by spine-tailed swifts in the summer of 1942-43. The white-throated needletail (Hirundapus caudacutus), also known as needle-tailed swift or spine-tailed swift, is a large swift in the genus Hirundapus. Historical pesticide applications coincided with an altered diet of aerially foraging insectivorous chimney swifts. Page 1 of 1 pages - image sightings only 302 12 12. White-Throated Needletail (105 mph) White-throated Needletail flying over northern Australia. This bird is quite large, and is the fastest bird during level flight, reaching speeds up to 105 mph. Fairy and tree martins have more rounded wings, white rump, pale underparts and almost square tail. White-throated Needletail: Three to six white eggs are laid in a nest made of various materials, glued together with saliva, and built in a hollow or similar crevice high in a tall conifer. These birds have very short legs which they use only for clinging to vertical surfaces. A powerful-looking swift with long saber-shaped wings and a bullet-shaped body. Only in rainy weather, in particularly near approaching storms, they are found hawking for insects above more open country, e.g. Species information. The nominate race caudacutus breeds in Siberia and northern China and Japan and spends the non-breeding season in New Guinea and the eastern half of Australia. Heather, B.; Robertson, H. 1996. White-throated needletail is a large swift found in the rocky hills of Siberia and Asia. Swifts are among the fastest of birds, and larger species like the white-throated needletail have been reported travelling at up to 169 km/h (105 mph) in level flight. Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic birds. No estimate. Authors. White-throated needletails have been recorded from both main islands as well as the Snares Islands and Chatham Island. In New Zealand they are most often reported over islands and headlands. Needletails are fast-flying birds that spend most of the year on the wing, only landing during the breeding season and when roosting. Image 1 of 2. Vol. in open farmland with scattered trees. Preferred breeding grounds are found in the rocky hillsides of central Asia and southern Siberia. June 26, 2013 - The White-throated Needletail after it died flying into a wind turbine in Scotland. Preferred breeding grounds are found in the rocky hillsides of central Asia and southern Siberia. 2 to 7 eggs are laid in a scrape or natural depression in a tree hollow. The White-throated Needletail feeds on flying insects, such as termites, ants, beetles and flies. Foraging and Feeding. Higgins, P.J. Cornell Lab of Ornithology & Princeton University Press, Ithaca. 5. N.Z. Hundreds of white-throated needletail birds seen at Diggers Camp, Yuraygir National Park, northern NSW, 9th December 2016. Second edn. White Throated Needletail. Find the magnitude and direction of a displacement vector that has x component-24.0 m and y component -11.0 m. Choose the positive x direction as east and choose the positive y direction as north 3. (Browse free accounts on the home page.). Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. Philip Chantler and Guy M. Kirwan. The White Throated Needletail, also called the Spine Tailed Swift or the Needle Tailed Swift, is the fastest bird when powered flight is considered, clocking in at an amazing 106mph! The White-throated Needletail (Hirundapus caudacutus), also known as Needle-tailed Swift or Spine-tailed Swift, is a large swift. 1999. Melville, D.S. Insectivorous, probably taking a wide range of species carried aloft as ‘aerial plankton’. Swifts - a guide to the swifts and treeswifts of the world. The white-throated needletail can move at speeds up to 47.0 m/s in level flight. Recommended citation. It is the fastest-flying bird in flapping flight, with confirmed speeds reaching 111.6 km/h (69.3 mph). Parrots to Dollarbird. The White-throated needletail (Hirundapus caudacutus), also known as needle-tailed swift or spine-tailed swift, is a species of large swift in the Apodidae family. Nocera, J.J.; Blais, J.M. Welcome swallow has a deeply forked tail, glossy blue-black upper parts, red face and pale greyish underparts. 2004. Distribution / Range. The White-throated Needletail (Hirundapus caudacutus), also known as Needle-tailed Swift or Spine-tailed Swift, is a large swift. They catch the insects in flight in their wide gaping beaks. Pp. Viking, Auckland. Unlock thousands of full-length species accounts and hundreds of bird family overviews when you subscribe to Birds of the World. A dark-plumaged, cigar-shaped bird with a distinctive white throat, a white horseshoe mark under the tail, and a pale greyish patch in the centre of the back. A dark-plumaged cigar-shaped bird with a distinctive white throat, a white horseshoe mark under the tail, and a pale greyish patch in the centre of the back. Feeding and diet. Chantler, P. and G. M. Kirwan (2016). In Miskelly, C.M. New Zealand Birds Online. www.nzbirdsonline.org.nz At close range, the fine white forehead and bluish tinge to the back are also visible. Foraging birds may reach heights in excess of 1000 m and often forage on the edge of low pressure systems. White-throated Needletail: Faroese: Loftsveimari: Finnish: piikkipyrstökiitäjä … It is one of the fastest-flying bird in flapping flight, being capable of speeds up to 170 km/h (105 mph). None known, however it is likely that populations of prey species have been and are being affected by pesticide use and air pollution, which remain serious problems in much of East Asia, as well as global climate change. The strong, powerful body and the long curved wings enable the bird to achieve exceptional speed in flight.